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Don't Tas me bro

Senior Airman Michael Dennee on left and Staff Sgt. Tommy Rodgers on right seem to find joy in the pain that Airman 1st Class Cassidy Milliman is receiving. In order to fully qualify on the X26 Taser, members had to experience firsthand the incapacitation delivered by the 50,000 volts penetrating their body.

Senior Airman Michael Dennee on left and Staff Sgt. Tommy Rodgers on right seem to find joy in the pain that Airman 1st Class Cassidy Milliman is receiving. In order to fully qualify on the X26 Taser, members had to experience firsthand the incapacitation delivered by the 50,000 volts penetrating their body. (Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Cathy Perretta )

Officer Tom Licata, Niagara Falls Police Department Firearms Instructor, schools Airman 1st Class Michael Maio on the proper use of the X26 Taser. During a daylong class, 107 AW Security Force Members learned the techniques necessary to safely immobilize an evil doer using an electronic control device aka Taser.

Officer Tom Licata, Niagara Falls Police Department Firearms Instructor, schools Airman 1st Class Michael Maio on the proper use of the X26 Taser. During a daylong class, 107 AW Security Force Members learned the techniques necessary to safely immobilize an evil doer using an electronic control device aka Taser. (Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Cathy Perretta )

Niagara Falls, NY -- @#&! Were some of the explicit adjective that screeched from of the mouths of many New York Air National Guard's 107th Airlift Wing Security Forces members this past UTA.
"I don't have to do it again, do I?" asked Senior Airman Michael Dennee, security forces member, in response to 50,000 volts shooting throughout his body.
During the March UTA the Niagara Falls Police Department conducted and funded a Taser training class in the security forces classroom giving security force members the vital training needed to safely and effectively participate in Detainee Movement Operations.
"More and more often we are called upon to participate in DMO's," said Master Sgt. Jason Folckemer, SFS. "We need to be trained on the taser," he added.
Officer Tom Licata, NFPD Firearms Instructor began the class with a power point presentation that explained the system, its capabilities and uses.
"With more than 50,000 volts shooting through your body, it takes a perp down instantly," said Licata.
The system has no lasting affect, and recovery is immediate. Amps kill; the human body can safely handle high voltage if administered at low amperage. The Taser X26 is a pistol style electronic control device that projects probes up to 25 feet penetrating the subjects clothing and/or skin. The X26 has a preset 5 second cycle time but can be over ridden by the operator to either increase or decrease the effective time.
"Give the tax payer their money's worth," said Licata "If you have to shoot them, give them the full 5 seconds," he added.
After the students fully understood the safe operation, handling and use of the nonlethal weapon, targets were erected. The students lined up to get a feel for the X26; they took their stance, loaded, aimed and fired. As the arcing from the electrodes filled the room, the excitement quickly changed to uncertainty for they knew what was coming next.
In order to be fully qualified students had to experience first hand what a perpetrator would feel. One by one they lined up to get zapped. With spotters on either side, the probes taped on the instructor squeezed the trigger of the X26 until they cried uncle. Needless to say the comments are not suitable for print. It's just a good thing they weren't training with 45's.