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Lake Effect Storm hits Niagara

107th Crew Chief Airman 1st Class Nicholas Ruhland performs his aircraft precheck on the C-130 at the Niagara Falls Reserve Station while the lake effect storms hits the area on December 9, 2011. (Air Force Photo/SMSgt Ray Lloyd)

107th Crew Chief Airman 1st Class Nicholas Ruhland performs his aircraft precheck on the C-130 at the Niagara Falls Reserve Station while the lake effect storms hits the area on December 9, 2011. (Air Force Photo/SMSgt Ray Lloyd)

Lake effect snow doesn't stop the members of the 107th and 914th Airlift Wings prep the C-130 aircraft for its mission. Deicing is being done before flight on December 9, 2011. (Air Force Photo/SMSgt Ray Lloyd)

Lake effect snow doesn't stop the members of the 107th and 914th Airlift Wings prep the C-130 aircraft for its mission. Deicing is being done before flight on December 9, 2011. (Air Force Photo/SMSgt Ray Lloyd)

Senior Airman Rosen Rose from the 914th Airlift Wing electric shop does some final inspections on the C-130 at the Niagara Falls Reserve Station while the lake effect storms hits the area.(Air Force Photo/SMSgt Ray Lloyd)

Senior Airman Rosen Rose from the 914th Airlift Wing electric shop does some final inspections on the C-130 at the Niagara Falls Reserve Station while the lake effect storms hits the area.(Air Force Photo/SMSgt Ray Lloyd)

Niagara Falls Reserve Station -- When it comes to working in the snow, the airmen at the Niagara Falls Reserve Station know the mission must go on. Members from the 107th and 914th Airlift Wings work together getting the C-130 aircraft ready for today's mission. "Until the SOF (Supervisor of Flying) tells us they're going to be a weather hold or mission cancel we need to have the aircraft ready to fly, "Said Tech Sgt Robert Miller, 107th Crew Chief. The 107th AW works with and shares the same C-130 airframes as its counterparts, the Air Force Reserves 914th AW. The two associated units work together, sharing the same resources.

The 107th mission is to provide airlift and military personnel in support of federal and state contingencies while maintaining the highest state of readiness. Perform at a level of excellence that sets the standard for others to emulate.

The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the tactical portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for airdropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. C-130s operate throughout the U.S. Air Force, serving with Air Mobility Command (stateside based), theater commands, Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve Command, fulfilling a wide range of operational missions in both peace and war situations. Basic and specialized versions of the aircraft airframe perform a diverse number of roles, including airlift support, Arctic ice resupply, aeromedical missions, aerial spray missions, fire-fighting duties for the U.S. Forest Service and natural disaster relief missions.

So when you hear the rumbling of those engines above, you know that your citizen's airmen are at work serving our nation.