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You can't buy a ticket for this ride

On Aug. 8, bosses from both the New York Air National Guard?s 107th Airlift Wing and the Air Force Reserve?s 914th Airlift Wing were invited for an exclusive event designed just for them. Employers received a taste of the Guard/Reserve mission through demonstration, displays and were also able to come along for a ride. The C-130 ramp was lowered and the bosses got a birds-eye view.(Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

On Aug. 8, bosses from both the New York Air National Guard’s 107th Airlift Wing and the Air Force Reserve’s 914th Airlift Wing were invited for an exclusive event designed specifically for the employer. This is a unique opportunity that only employers get to experience. Most people including Guardsmen and reservists do not get this opportunity. Employers received a taste of the Niagara Falls’ Guard and Reserve mission through demonstrations, displays and were also invited along for an experience of a lifetime, a ride on a C-130.(U.S.Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Senior Airman Shea, fits Terry Eisenman for a gas mask. Employers had the opportunity to see and try some of the equipment Airmen are issued and have to train with. (Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Senior Airman Shea, fits Terry Eisenman for a gas mask. Employers had the opportunity to see and try on some of the equipment Airmen are issued and have to train with. (U.S. Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Cheryl Taylor, Dispatcher, Niagara Wheatfield School picks up a pair of ear plugs prior to her C-130 flight. Taylor, is the boss of the 107th?s Master Sgt. Paul Brundage who works for the school system in his civilian life. (Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Cheryl Taylor, Dispatcher, Niagara Wheatfield School picks up a pair of ear plugs prior to her C-130 flight. Taylor, is the boss of the 107th's Master Sgt. Paul Brundage who works for the school system in his civilian life. (U.S. Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

The moment will be forever etched in digital history for a group of local employers, prior to their flight of a life time the group gathered for a photo. Guardsman?s and reservist?s bosses had the opportunity to visit the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station on the first joint 107th and 914th Bosses? Day held on Aug. 8. (Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

The moment will be forever etched in digital history for a group of local employers, prior to their flight of a life time the group gathered for a photo. Guardsman's and reservist's bosses had the opportunity to visit the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station on the first joint 107th and 914th Bosses' Day, held on Aug. 8. (U.S. Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Civilian bosses buckle in, check their cameras and prepare for take off. (Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Civilian bosses buckle in, check their cameras and prepare for take off. (U.S.Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Senior Airman Tiffany Seager, loadmaster, 914th AW, keeps eye on the rear of the C-130. Pilots from the 107th AW position the aircraft for premium viewing of local attractions such as the ?Falls? Orchard Stadium and the Niagara River.(Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Senior Airman Tiffany Seager, loadmaster, 914th AW, keeps eye on the rear of the C-130. Pilots from the 107th AW position the aircraft for premium viewing of local attractions such as the “Falls” Orchard Stadium and the Niagara River.(U.S.Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Bosses kept members from both the 107th and the 914th security forces busy all day. A display of numerous weapons was set up for the employers to ask questions, touch, pick and safely handle.(Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Bosses kept members from both the 107th and the 914th security forces busy all day. A display of numerous weapons was set up for the employers to ask questions, touch, pick up and safely handle.(U.S.Air Force Photo/ Master Sgt. Paul Brundage)

Niagara Fall, NY -- "This is an experience of a life time," said Jordan Evans, manager, Uhaul. Evans was join by more than 175 civilian employers that had the opportunity to experience a C-130. On Aug. 8, the New York Air National Guard's 107th Airlift Wing and the Air Force Reserves 914th Airlift Wing held its first joint Bosses' Day.
Each year a day is set a side to give thanks to the civilian employers for the sacrifices they make. Without their support the Guard and Reserve units would not be able to function as they should. This was the first year that the 107th and the 914th worked together, along with the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve to ensure the bosses were treated to a day of event they would not soon forget.
"I look forward to this each year," said Sandy Silverberg, Attorney, Silverberg, Mcgoory, Sellers and Silverberg. "Last year I watched as a fighter jet was refueled," he said. He was referring to last year when the 107th was an air refueling wing and flying KC-135s. Silverberg attended last years bosses' day where he flew on a refueling mission.
Throughout the morning, while enjoying coffee and donuts donated by Tim Hortons, employers interacted with Guardsmen and Reservist who demonstrated proper wear of chemical warfare, C-130 engine maintenance and life support demonstrations.
Employers also had the opportunity to safely handle weapons such as the M-249 machine gun, the M-4 machine gun and the M-203 grenade launcher. A C-130 and crew were on hand to answer questions and familiarize employers with the layout and the specifications of the C-130 prior to their flight briefing.
During the flight briefing, employers were given safety rules and flight paths. Employers were also addressed by both commanders, Col. Patrick Ginavan, 107th AW and Col. Reinhard Schmidt, 914th AW. Recently the 107th converted from KC-135s to C-130s. Guardsmen will be called upon to retrain on the new air frame with some schools lasting as long as nine months.
"This is a unique opportunity for our guardsmen to show their employers our new mission, "said Col. Ginavan.
Along with the conversion to the C-130s, the 107th AW and the 914th AW will now be associated and working together as one.
"This is the first opportunity for us to demonstrate to our members' employers the new association and the building of Team Niagara for a strong future," said Col. Schmidt.
After the briefing the employers were then bussed out to the waiting C-130s where they received their final briefing from Senior Airman Tiffany Seager, one of the loadmaster controlling the rear of the C-130. The engines began to roar and the air frame began to shake as the C-130 raced down the runway. The shaking subsided as it became airborne. After only a few minutes of flight, the loadmasters went to the rear of the plane donned their helmets and tethered themselves in. The loud screeching of hydraulics filled the plane as passengers looked at each other in anticipation; they knew what was going to happen next. As light started to fill the rear of the plane, their eyes lit up like kids at Christmas. The rear ramp was opening giving the employers a birds-eye view of the falls. The pilots piloted the C-130 around to many local attractions such as the Bills Stadium, the Niagara River and Marine Land.
During the flight over the "Falls," Evans said "you should charge for this," 'No, we are grateful for your support,' said the writer.
Back on solid ground the employers were greeted by a representative of ESGR who had arranged and paid for a tasty chicken barbecue with all the fixings to be served. As employers sat enjoying their meal, chatter about their experience filled the hangar.
This day was about the employer and giving thanks. Employers like Evans who manages a Uhaul shop of only six employees feels the crunch when his employee Staff Sgt. Jason Sinclair is called upon, but stated "supporting him is the least we can do, he's serving our country." "When he deploys, his job will be waiting for him," he said.